Tag Archives: Brake Lines

Installing extended front brakelines from Black Widow Performance

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When I installed the front 52″ springs, I realized I was going to need some brakelines that would up to the new requirements. I decided to go with Black Widow Performance’s (BWP) braided stainless steel extended brakelines because they are longer than what you’d typically get from one of the lift kit manfacturers. The brakelines are made by Crown to BWP’s specifications, they are  10,000PSI tested, D.O.T approved brake lines. Construction is as follows; teflon core, wrapped in kevlar, wrapped in a protective material then wrapped in braided stainless steel with a protective vinyl covering available in custom colors. I chose clear.

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They are  33″ long:

Installing extended front brakelines from Black Widow Performance

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The kit includes (2) 33″ braided stainless steel lines, (4) copper washers, (2) spring clips, (2) brackets, and (2) self-tapping screws.

Installing extended front brakelines from Black Widow Performance

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The installation is pretty simple. It took me 15minutes per side. I needed 4 tools, but if you’re lucky you’ll only need 3:

  1. 9/16″ wrench: flare fitting nut
  2. 11/16″ wrench: brakeling side of flare fitting
  3. 7/16″ socket: banjo bolt
  4. Unlucky #4: vice grips because one of my flare nuts rounded off

Installing extended front brakelines from Black Widow Performance

 

The first thing I did was take the banjo bolt out. You’ll have fluid coming out, so have a catch pan ready. Next pop the flare fitting loose and you can just twist the brakeline off.

Installing extended front brakelines from Black Widow Performance

 

That’s it, the old line has been removed. Next step is to install it.

I start by threading the flare fitting together, but not tight yet. Then I install the banjo bolt. The casting on the Dana 60 caliper only permits one orientation, so you might as well torque it down because there’s no moving it around anyways. Make sure you get a copper washer on either side of the banjo fitting and ensure there is no junk on the mating surface for the caliper.

Installing extended front brakelines from Black Widow Performance

Installing extended front brakelines from Black Widow Performance

Being the torque geek that I am, I tried to find the torque spec for the banjo bolt with no success. I just get it pretty much as tight as I feel comfortable with the little 1/4″ drive ratchet.

Now just tighten the flare fitting. Put the spring clip on and you’ve got it all together. It works best if you can get someone to depress the brake pedal so you can perform a leak check. You’re not done yet, but it sure looks pretty!

Installing extended front brakelines from Black Widow Performance

 

Once both sides have been installed, the next step is to bleed the breaks. This is one job I don’t like. Kind of tedious and messy, and the real pain comes if your bleeder screws are jacked. I’m lucky and my axles lived in a dry climate; if you have east coast axles, you have a better chance of bleeder screw nightmare.

Start by popping the master cylinder cover and making sure the reservoirs are full. After topping the levels off, leave the cap on but don’t put the retainer on. You want it to be easy for fluid to be drawn, but prevent splash-over during pedal return. Trust me, I’ve tried it without the cover on.

Installing extended front brakelines from Black Widow Performance

I’ve made my own little brake bleeding kit using some clear vinyl tubing from Home Depot, 5/16″ ID, and a glass jar with lid. I drilled 2 holes in the lid, one to hold the tube in the jar during bleeding and the second hole is to store the other end when not in use. Poor a little fluid in the bottom of the jar so the tube is submerged.

For the Dana 60 bleeder, you need a 10mm end wrench.

Installing extended front brakelines from Black Widow Performance

Put the box end on the bleeder and then put the tube on.

Installing extended front brakelines from Black Widow Performance

You’ll need to people to bleed brakes in this manner. Start on the passenger side. Have your helper pump the brakes up a couple of times. Don’t pump them super-fast because you can actually cavitate the master cylinder.

Have your helper hold pressure on the brake pedal. This may be tricky if the brakes really need bled badly. Just make sure they maintain enough pressure to move the pedal down slowly. Once they are holding pressure crack the bleeder. With the clear vinyl tube you’ll be able to see the air bubbles leaving the caliper. Have your helper holler once the pedal approaches bottom, you tighten the bleeder screw and give them the all clear to let the pedal up.

You may want to be careful about bottoming the pedal out too far because there could be corrosion or sediment build-up would damage the seals in the master cylinder.

Continue the procedure by having your partner pump up the brakes again and go from there. You want to do this until there are no more bubbles appearing in the clear tube leaving the bleeder screw. Once this happens move to the other caliper. But first, refill the master cylinder reservoir.

Now you’re done! Go out and enjoy with confidence knowing that you won’t pop a brakeline.

Installing extended front brakelines from Black Widow Performance

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